Effects of combined resistance training and weightlifting on motor skill performance of adolescent male athletes

Maulder, New Zealand (2019) Effects of combined resistance training and weightlifting on motor skill performance of adolescent male athletes. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 33 (12). pp. 3226-3235. ISSN 1064-8011

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Official URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31765343

Abstract or Summary

Resistance training and weightlifting are regarded as safe and effective training methods for youth. However, no studies have examined the effects of a year-long resistance training program using weightlifting movements on strength, speed, or power. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the long-term effects of combined resistance training (traditional strength training + plyometrics)with or without weightlifting movements on motor skill performance of adolescent males. Fifty-nine males aged 12–14 years were matched by maturity and allocated to a combined resistance training or a combined resistance training with weightlifting group. Each group completed 28 total weeks of training over an academic year. Pre-, mid- (14 weeks of training), and post-training (28 weeks of training) tests included the resistance training skills battery quotient (RTSQ), absolute isometric midthigh pull peak force (IMTPABS) and ratio-scaled isometric midthigh pull peak force (IMTPREL), countermovement jump, horizontal jump, and 10-, 20-, and 30-m sprint. Repeated-measure analysis of variance revealed that there were no significant between-group responses, but all variables improved significantly within-group. Both groups made small-moderate improvements in RTSQ, IMTPABS, and IMTPREL after the first 14 training weeks(d = 0.45–0.86), whereas small-moderate improvements in lower body power, upper body power, and speed were made after the second 14 training weeks (d = 0.30–0.95). Both groups made small-moderate improvements in all performance variables after 28 weeks of training. These findings highlight the importance of establishing movement competency and strength as a foundation for the subsequent development of power. Furthermore, these findings may help practitioners understand the time course of certain adaptations following a long-term periodized plan for adolescent males.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords that describe the item:youth, long-term athletic development, strength, power, speed
Subjects:Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions:Schools > Centre for Sport Science and Human Performance
ID Code:7176
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Deposited On:03 Feb 2020 00:39
Last Modified:03 Feb 2020 00:39

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